The Feast of Purim

 

 

The Feast of Purim
 

 
The story of Purim is found in the Book of Esther, neatly tucked away between Nehemiah and Job. Purim celebrates the courage and faith displayed by Mordecai (from the tribe of Benjamin) and Queen Esther (they were cousins). It recognizes God’s continued faithfulness and promise of Jewish preservation. What makes the Book of Esther so unique is that the name of God is not mentioned even once throughout the entire story. While there are no O.T. references for the Book of Esther, there is one possible N.T. reference which demands a critical eye. This is found in John 5:1 “After this there was a feast of the Jews, and Jesus went up to Jerusalem”.  Some scholars say this verse can refer to Purim which would point to Yeshua having indeed celebrated this feast. How interesting, that this feast in John 5 is unnamed. Perhaps this is to keep in line with the fact that God is unnamed in the Book of Esther itself.
 

In spite of much scholarly criticism, we believe that the Book of Esther is a part of God’s inspired Word. There is historical data to authenticate this event, most of which centers around the information on Xerxes. Historical writings refer to his large harem in Shushan, his irrational temper and his drinking parties. On the flip side, there is no evidence from any other outside source to contradict this story.    Read more…



The Fall Feasts of Israel

When God gave the Mosaic Law to Israel, He was very generous. Among the many commandments, He also gave the Jews many holidays; along with the weekly Sabbath, there were many feasts to commemorate and celebrate. These were set or appointed times, what the Hebrew calls Moedim, selected times when the individual would stop all his works to rest and even rejoice. Read more…


The Spring Feasts of Israel

 

 

 
What is the major difference between the feasts mentioned in Column 1 and Column 2?
 

If you answered that Column 1’s feasts take place in the Spring, while Column 2’s feasts take place in the Fall you would be correct. But there is something else!

If you have figured out that Column 1’s feasts have already been fulfilled, while Column 2’s feasts are still waiting for their prophetic fulfillment, then you are an eschatology buff.
 

This year, the first Feast of Israel, Passover, will be observed April 10-17. Here is something remarkable concerning the correlation between the passage in the Hebrew Scripture and its fulfillment in the Messiah. Read more…



At Least to One Jew

at-least-to-one-jew-2

By Jacques Isaac Gabizon

 

In Montreal, there are about 100,000 Jews, and we are often confronted by this question: “Why should we go to the Jew first? Isn’t 
Romans 1:16 purely historical?” The underlying argument is that we are perhaps being too exclusive in our outreach and way too sympathetic and partisan to the Jew first. I often ask our brothers and sisters in the faith who object to this approach if they have had opportunity to witness to at least one Jewish person. Lo and behold, most of them confess that they do know perhaps one, two, or more Jewish people, but they cannot confirm that they have ever approached them with the gospel. So I encourage them, and arguing from Romans 1:16, I point out that they ought very well to include the Jews within all the people groups who need to hear the Word. They must not themselves be so tendentious. In light of the great commission given by Yeshua, all nations were to be reached with the gospel, barring none.

Read more…